Science Explains Why Great Minds Choose the Same Outfit Every Day!

Joseph Kalu

Steve Jobs, Einstein, and Zuckerberg: Science Explains Why Great Minds Choose the Same Outfit Every Day!

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Have you ever wondered what to wear and how much time you spend picking it up in the morning? I am sure, it has undoubtedly made you go late to work, an occasion, or even school more than you can remember.

We spend our precious time obsessing over material things we enjoy, but an outfit can’t alter the world.

Truth be told, it will make no difference in your day. This identical principle may help in understanding why science explains why great minds choose the same outfit every day!

Although this is not to imply that fashion or a superb dress is not important, it has a crucial impact on culture and, as a result, it directs our society. Indeed, fashion is a convergence of history, art, and culture.

We do not want to flood you with fashion talk, rather, we want to show you why these successful people choose the same outfit every day!

Similarly, the famous American author Henry David Thoreau once said, “Our life are frittered away by detail….Simply, simplify.” In other words, don’t worry about minor details.

Decision Fatigue: Why Many Presidents And CEOs Wear The Same Thing Every Day

Science Explains Why Great Minds Choose the Same Outfit Every Day!
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Whether you believe it or not, or you like him or not, it’s hard to deny that the President of the United States has the most difficult job in the world.

As the leader of one of the world’s most influential and powerful nations, the president faces many challenges. Regardless of the good deeds the president does, he will face criticism. Simply put, the president has many more things to focus on than his outfit.

This is exactly why all United States presidents wear the same outfit every day.

Almost every day — remember when he wore a khaki suit and the internet exploded? (That probably speaks more about us than about him.) Obama, on the other hand, almost always wears a blue or gray suit.

In a 2012 interview with Vanity Fair, Obama explained why he only wears gray or blue suits. “I’m attempting to make fewer decisions. I don’t want to decide what to eat or wear. Because I have so many other decisions to make.”

He presented studies that suggest that the sheer process of making judgments affects one’s ability to make subsequent decisions.

As Stuart Heritage said in The Guardian, “Barack Obama has pared his wardrobe down to such a degree that he can confidently walk into any situation and make decisions that directly impact the future of mankind.”

The president is not alone in his practice. Every day, the late, great Steve Jobs donned his customary black turtleneck, trousers, and sneakers.

Furthermore, when seen in public, Mark Zuckerberg often wears a gray t-shirt, a black hoodie, and trousers.

Similarly, Albert Einstein allegedly bought many gray outfits to avoid the decision of what to wear in the morning.

This is all related to the concept of decision fatigue, which is a genuine mental strain in which a person’s productivity diminishes as a result of becoming mentally weary from making too many meaningless decisions.

Simply put, by worrying over what to eat or dress every day, people may become less productive at work.

This is why people like President Joe Biden, Steve Jobs, and Mark Zuckerberg, chose to simplify their lives by dressing in a uniform.

Obviously, given that these are some of history’s most successful and productive men, they may be onto something.

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Make Life Simple.

Indeed, having a broad variety of wear may be overestimated. We waste so much time worrying about things that have no real consequences, and we have no idea how easily we can reverse this.

This is why Uruguay’s President José Mujica resists uniformity and refuses to wear a tie. “The tie is a useless rag that constricts your neck. “I’m against consumerism,” he remarked.

“Because of this hyperconsumerism, we’re forgetting about fundamental things and wasting human strength on frivolities that have little to do with human happiness.”

In my perspective, he is entirely correct. The broad majority of people are guilty of worrying about material possessions. When it comes down to it, they add very little value to our lives.

True fulfillment is gained by going out into the world and effecting tangible and positive change. Buying a new pair of shoes may boost your confidence in the short term, but it will not improve your life in the long term.

Undoubtedly, the world would be a rather boring place if we all wore the same thing every day. However, we may all consider simplifying our lives even more by decreasing the amount of time we spend thinking about trivial aspects of our days.

During the process, one may notice that they are less worried, more productive, and more satisfied. Life is complicated enough; don’t let trivial matters determine your pleasure.

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